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But the educational gap between the different communities is closing. It is working-class whites who seem to be doing worst now.

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Increasingly, however, racial clashes are seen as a sign of cultural alienation. There are schools in London and Leicester where scarcely a white face is to be seen. A recent row over face veils exposed unease at what many see as growing separation within Britain. The issue, say some, is not multiculturalism but Islam. Such generalisations are invidious. Britain's Muslims range from sophisticated professional people to simple village folk.

Some Muslims shop at or even own Harrods, some run a corner store. Devout Muslims may follow Sufism, or Wahhabism, or neither; and some are no more observant than most Anglicans ie, not very. Perhaps 14, are converts. And if there is one thing many of them have in common, it is a dislike of being classed mainly as Muslims, rather than as doctors, shopkeepers or just individuals. Christian Britain has been a largely secular place for decades. But things are changing: when an employee of British Airways was denied permission to wear a small cross, squawks were heard across the land.

BA prudently agreed to reconsider. Immigrants with more burning Christian convictions are pouring in, from Poland, the Philippines and Africa. As a group, Britain's Muslims come across as more disaffected than their co-religionists elsewhere. In polls an unusually high proportion identify themselves as Muslim first and British second, and younger folk are more likely to do so than their parents.

They are also more likely than Muslims in, say, Germany or France to hold Western values in contempt. This may be more of a reflection on Britain's foreign policy than its domestic policy. Images of British and American troops mowing down Muslims in Iraq and Afghanistan have alienated many. And since the terrorist attacks on America on September 11th police have been stopping and searching a disproportionate number of Muslims.

The bombs that exploded in London on July 7th shocked the nation not just because they left 56 people dead but also because among the bodies were those of four suicide-bombers from ethnic minorities who grew up in Britain. The video message left behind by their leader, Mohammad Sidique Khan, declaimed the grievances of Muslims in a broad Yorkshire accent. Since then more news has emerged of alleged plots that were foiled.

Mr Blair has given warning that the threat from home-grown Islamist terrorism will last for a generation. But what exactly motivates it? Not segregation, it seems. Ludi Simpson, a statistician at Manchester University, says that Muslims charged with terrorist offences are no more likely to come from heavily Muslim areas than from whiter ones. Nor do they seem especially poor. For over a decade critics in Washington and Paris have been accusing Britain of protecting dangerously radical clerics. Since some of Mr Blair's toughest—and mainly unsuccessful—parliamentary battles have been over measures to tighten security by limiting the right to free speech and prompt trial.

Threatened or not and perhaps earlier experience with the IRA has created a certain robustness in the face of terrorism , Britain is a liberal country not easily shaken from its beliefs. Many are now wondering whether Britain has struck the right balance between encouraging cultural diversity and insisting on a shared national identity. Yet in order for minorities and majority to accept a common identity, there must be a clear idea of what it means to be British, and that is lacking. Britain has always been a union of nations.

That may be one reason why multiculturalism came easily to it. But with devolution, the Scots and Welsh are becoming keener on their more local identities see article and less interested in being British. Mr Brown has long argued for a new definition of Britishness around which the country's different peoples could unite. This identity, he says, should consist of shared values such as decency, tolerance, fair play and the rule of law.

The trouble is that although this tolerant rule-abiding society does exist, it is not always visible to Britain's minorities. They are understandably dismayed, for example, by the behaviour of Britain's young, who are statistically the worst-behaved in Europe on an wide range of measures. So what identity might a more united Britain strive towards? The chances are that one will evolve spontaneously, if at all.

But education is bound to play a part in it. It is not just a question of teaching British history in a clear and inclusive way, but of improving education across all subjects. The higher the quality of education, the more likely the different groups are to blend. Polls suggest that highly educated people tend to be more open and less prejudiced.

They are also likely to earn more money, which gives them more choice over where to live. Mr Blair, the man who has helped to shape British identity for nearly a decade, is preparing to step down. So what will Britain be like when he has gone?


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Economist Films. The Economist apps. More up icon. Special report: Britannia redux A house with many mansions There is nothing wrong with multiculturalism. The problem is terrorism print-edition icon Print edition Special report Feb 3rd Special report Britannia redux Britannia redux A lost opportunity Living by their wits Suck it and see Clever stuff A house with many mansions The rose and the thistle The changing of the guard Full steam ahead Sources and acknowledgements. Dec 31, Brandon rated it it was ok. There is something exciting about starting a new book.

And, if you know nothing about the book, there is an air of mystery attached, too. Which is probably why I never refuse to read a book that has been recommended to me by a friend. Something deep down inside says to me, "If this person you know liked it, you should totally give it a shot. You'll probably like it! I'll be curious to hear what you think. I didn't finish the book. Something I rarely let happen. Before I explain why I set down the book, let me explain the general premise.

The author of this book has combed over countless records of Edgar Cayce's experiences in helping people understand their previous lives. Yep, reincarnation. Through case studies, each chapter expounds on how certain traits from previous lives will impact the life you're living. Now, my reason for abandoning this book: It was simply asking too much of me.

The book is built on a foundation of beliefs and assumptions that I simply do not and probably can not believe, and therefore as I read page after page I could assign very little validity to the arguments the author was making. A short list of offenses: reincarnation, the lost city of Atlantis, karma, mentalism. Would I like to believe in these things? Eh, maybe. Sometimes I feel like karma is playing out in the lives around me, but I do not feel like karma - or any of these beliefs - are as scientifically quantifiable as the author professes them to be.

Does this make me closed minded and unwilling to open myself up to new beliefs? I hope not, but the argument could be made. I'm sure this opens me up to criticism of my own religion and beliefs The book still gets a couple of stars from me in the rating. Primarily because it is a well-written book. The author is no dummy So, she gets credit for the work put forth to reach her conclusions.

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Jan 19, Chris rated it it was amazing. A really amazing book. I am one to be subject to the more hocus pocusy sorts of things, but this book takes a very open mindedly scientific approach. Many of the more unexplainable, or seemingly inconsistent, things in my life have finally been set to order for me and has now put me on my way to seeking out testing this new theory on spirituality presented in the book.

I get sort of annoyed with myself while explaining this because continually referring back to "that book" feels cultish to me, h A really amazing book. I get sort of annoyed with myself while explaining this because continually referring back to "that book" feels cultish to me, hence the hope to get beyond using that as reference. Either way, if you're looking for something that will make sense to get at spiritual questions that have been nagging you, I would highly recommend giving this book a shot. View 1 comment. Feb 04, Mtejeda rated it it was amazing.

I read this when it was first published in the late 's and still remember being absolutely stunned. I can actually see myself reading as I walked down the street in San Francisco where I was working as a legal secretary, completely absorbed in the book and paying no attention to the visceral world around me. I had a profound influence on my thinking and understanding of spirituality.

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I think it may be time to read it again Aug 12, Michael rated it really liked it. As the consummate skeptic, I still have a hard time with reincarnation. No question, it answers so many questions and fills in the blanks of so many inequities and theodicies so visible in life.

If your cosmology is in a state of flux, try this on for size. It certainly isn't the whole story, but it helps. Jan 05, Asha Mohun rated it liked it. An interesting book with Edgar Cayce's an American fortune teller lived during 19th century case studies on reincarnation, lost city of Atlantis and many more. Jan 31, Adele rated it really liked it. Anything about Edgar Cayce is good for the soul. I liked this book in particular because it is about reincarnation and how it fits into Christianity.

Feb 25, Daniel Rickenbach rated it it was ok. Too metaphysical for my liking Since I never met Edgar Cayce personally I cannot judge his character. It seems that he had a heart for and a genuine interest in doing much good in life and was able to help many people. I think that we cannot expect all people in all times to be helped in the same way. Maybe this was a work for a specific time in human evolution.

Mystery is intriguing. I did find myself wondering how the seekers really ended up feeling about the Too metaphysical for my liking I did find myself wondering how the seekers really ended up feeling about their over all experiences. It's one thing to be given hope, but another thing to actually experience real, postitive change in one's life.

It concerns me that previous lives, which I tried and still try to have an open mind to are used in more than strictly metaphoric purposes. It is hard for me to accept that today I'm struggling through an issue because of some previous, pre-existing issue that needs solving from a lifetime that I'm burdened with today. I choose to be born into this current life seems to be a very subjective idea.

Maybe some find this analogy helpful, but to me it makes me feel stranded I think all humans have a unique opportunity, at least in their individual existing lives to create the kind of person they'd like to be or they'd like to become I also wonder if life is about learning to explore, discover, and embrace our unique human freedom to be who we are. I'd like to know that life has purpose, but wonder at the safety of such certainty of "I have a purpose. I'm not sure I see freedom of personal self-actualization emerging in Cayce's Reincarnation views.

I have at least a working knowledge, at least through the eyes of Gina Cerminara of Cayce's work and the good that he did. I find that his concepts of the hypnotic state are intriguing, though I don't know if any of these subjective experiences might be useful from a scientific research point. At a minimum his work and views do resonate with some segments of the population, and if they find themselves helped then I cannot criticize too harshly.

Mar 03, Saiisha rated it really liked it Shelves: reviewed , self-help , spiritual. This was a well-researched, well-written book about Edgar Cayce's beliefs about karma and reincarnation, cases of healings through past life prognoses, and fantastic prophesies as a clairvoyant. Gina Cerminara does him great credit by taking the reader on a journey starting with Edgar's original beliefs as a Christian, but having to slowly change and acknowledge his new beliefs as he discovers his gifts as a medical clairvoyant.


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There are probably several hundred cases and examples discussed in This was a well-researched, well-written book about Edgar Cayce's beliefs about karma and reincarnation, cases of healings through past life prognoses, and fantastic prophesies as a clairvoyant. There are probably several hundred cases and examples discussed in several chapters about karma, reincarnation, mentalism, etc. These are topics that I'm very familiar with in my own background as well as my work as a soulistic life coach www.

The author's personal conjecture that Indians use the karma theory as an excuse for being "passive, lethargic and fatalistic. As thoroughly researched, cataloged and described as the cases are, I felt that the language was dry and detached. I recommend the book to anyone who's interested in learning more about Edgar Cayce, and a deeper dive into past lives, karma and reincarnation. Jun 10, Julie rated it it was amazing Shelves: non-fiction , spiritual-religous-mythology , reincarnation.

I have read about Edgar Cayce over the years, but this book delves into areas i didn't know much about; Cayce's 'life readings' which dealt with past-life experiences, karma, and healing. Although I did not agree with all of the thoughts set forth in this book e. Albeit - this book does have some deep christian belief's embedded i I have read about Edgar Cayce over the years, but this book delves into areas i didn't know much about; Cayce's 'life readings' which dealt with past-life experiences, karma, and healing. Albeit - this book does have some deep christian belief's embedded in it, but all in all a good read and a thought provoking study of a fascinating man.

I knew that Edgar Cayce was considered one of the best psychics of his time, but what I learned by reading this book is that he also gave people readings about past lives. Cayce, himself, was raised a Christian, so it took him quite a while before he believed in reincarnation. It read more like a text book at times, but it was very interesting. It seemed as though every time I came up with a question about the subject, within the next chapter or so, my question would be addressed and answered.

V I knew that Edgar Cayce was considered one of the best psychics of his time, but what I learned by reading this book is that he also gave people readings about past lives. Very interesting read. Apr 12, Mercy rated it liked it. This book broadened my perspective on past lives. I have always believed in reincarnation but this book gets in deeper and really puts it into perspective.

I definetly recommend this book. Its written off Edgar Cayce's work whom I consider brilliant. Jun 02, Niva rated it really liked it. The book discusses reincarnation, based on the many case readinds of Edgar Cayce, and its impplications to philosophy and religious beliefs. Why are we here? Why do we have the circumstances of life that we have or why do we have the kind of illness or personality that we have? It talks about karma as being redistributive justice or continuing process towards perfection. May 31, Diana rated it it was amazing. This book is about Edgar Cayce and his readings on reincarnation.

I first read this book more than 35 years ago. Here is a simple man who had extraordinary abilities. The topics addressed in this book are relevant today and provide alternate viewpoints on issues affecting society. Very, very interesting. Jun 05, Jan rated it it was ok. Pity as I had quite high hopes for that one Will have to find a new one Aug 20, Maria P rated it it was amazing. Very interesting book unlike the other book of edgar cayce I read are not so much irrelevant.

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Apr 08, Daniel Hernandez rated it it was amazing. This book is a treasure for believers of reincarnation. Sep 01, Candace rated it really liked it. It is documentation on channelled readings on reincarnation and karma. A very interesting read with lots of food for thought. Jan 10, AimeeWrites rated it really liked it.

Jul 15, Teressa rated it liked it. Definitely fascinating.