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This was the most comprehensive translation of the Grimms to date and almost certainly owes its origin to the enthusiasm for fairytales of Joseph Cundall, who was in partnership with Addey from to Cundall had previously published a different selection and translation from the Grimms in as well as their namesake A. It is more than likely that Addey and Co. Eight of them are full-page hand-coloured plates and extremely attractive in their evocation of picturesque pre-industrial Germany.

Of the fifty-six items eight were actually taken from medieval texts, and a further ten came from an early printed book usually known as the Buch der Beispiele der alten Weisen Book of Exempla from the Wise Ancients , which Bechstein knew in its last popular edition of This is a German version of the famous Oriental collection known in many languages and with many titles, but generally known in English as the Fables of Pilpay , of which the latest edition had appeared in The medieval tales are for the most part moral tales, and those from the Buch der Beispiele are chiefly animal fables.

Twelve are animal tales, and two have no protagonist.

10 Mini Stories

As far as the fairytales tales of magic are concerned, readers would not have noticed any obvious difference in tone and length from what they were accustomed to from the Grimms. In his German originals Bechstein does allow himself the occasional personally motivated aside, but these are just the things that the English translators were likely to remove or modify. The story concerns an old man who keeps his heart outside his body, turns six brothers and their prospective brides into stone and makes the seventh bride a virtual prisoner.

The girl then embroiders flowers on it to please him. The youngest brother, on his search, encounters an ox which he invites to share his food. But elsewhere there are deliberate alterations. This is a medieval story about how a knight tames an obstreperous mother and daughter who both want to mock and master their respective husbands. It is one of the most extreme examples of a tale calculated to teach women that their role in life is to be subservient to their husbands and fathers. The young knight who solves the situation first kills his falcon, then his hound and his horse for supposed disobedience in order to demonstrate what his new wife can expect from him.

The English translation omits all such allusions. In order to stop the boy from marrying his daughter, the king agrees to this indignity, but the boy whistles with his magic pipe and the hare comes running back to him. Indeed, many of them are only slightly different versions of tale-types already well known from the Grimms. The Bechstein volume also incorporated nine more tales by the Grimms, taken from the Addey and Co. All three were new versions of Bechstein, somewhat freer translations than those in The Old Story-Teller. They were credited to Bechstein and translated afresh.

Again, these are new translations of tales that had already appeared in The Old Story-Teller. With these anthologized stories the British transmission of Bechstein seems to have petered out until two new translations were issued in the s. Only a few of these made a mark in Britain, but prominent among them is the great German patriot, Ernst Moritz Arndt , who devoted the whole of his adult life to working for a Germany united culturally and politically on the basis of language.

After the defeat of Napoleon he became Professor of Modern History at the newly founded University of Bonn, but his liberal views led to his suspension from office for several years until he was reinstated in Towards the end of his long life Arndt gave up politics and devoted himself to scholarship. He did not live to experience the united Germany he had worked so hard for. A second edition of the work appeared in The publisher was G. The Fairy Book went through eleven editions up to , so that story gained wide circulation. This prints new translations of the tales that were already known, but extends the range of material to a total of seventeen tales.

This includes the stories edited by Madame de Chatelain and about as much again. Of the remaining eleven tales half a dozen are fairytales in the narrower sense and do not overlap with those of the Grimms. Most deal with figures that have been bewitched and can only be released from their enchantment by the successful completion of a series of difficult tasks. Very frequently they involve encounters with supernatural beings and attempt to explain the acquisition or loss of wealth.

They will only revert to human shape if a woman the same age as the mother comes along with seven sons for them to marry. Some of the legends demonstrate that these dangers are not always overcome. Books of legends of the Rhine were designed for the tourist trade and published in Germany in English from the s onwards, and travel books often included outlines of legends in connexion with the places they described. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book.

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Telling Tales - The Folktale Tradition in Germany - Open Book Publishers

More Details Original Title. Other Editions 4. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Again, these are new translations of tales that had already appeared in The Old Story-Teller.

With these anthologized stories the British transmission of Bechstein seems to have petered out until two new translations were issued in the s. Only a few of these made a mark in Britain, but prominent among them is the great German patriot, Ernst Moritz Arndt , who devoted the whole of his adult life to working for a Germany united culturally and politically on the basis of language. After the defeat of Napoleon he became Professor of Modern History at the newly founded University of Bonn, but his liberal views led to his suspension from office for several years until he was reinstated in Towards the end of his long life Arndt gave up politics and devoted himself to scholarship.

He did not live to experience the united Germany he had worked so hard for. A second edition of the work appeared in The publisher was G. The Fairy Book went through eleven editions up to , so that story gained wide circulation. This prints new translations of the tales that were already known, but extends the range of material to a total of seventeen tales.

This includes the stories edited by Madame de Chatelain and about as much again. Of the remaining eleven tales half a dozen are fairytales in the narrower sense and do not overlap with those of the Grimms. Most deal with figures that have been bewitched and can only be released from their enchantment by the successful completion of a series of difficult tasks. Very frequently they involve encounters with supernatural beings and attempt to explain the acquisition or loss of wealth.

They will only revert to human shape if a woman the same age as the mother comes along with seven sons for them to marry. Some of the legends demonstrate that these dangers are not always overcome. Books of legends of the Rhine were designed for the tourist trade and published in Germany in English from the s onwards, and travel books often included outlines of legends in connexion with the places they described.

A few of the most popular legends are in fact included in the small number of travel books about the Rhineland that were written for children by British authors. This was the story of Bishop Hatto of Mainz, whose cruelty towards his people was punished by his being pursued to a tower on an island in the Rhine and eaten by mice. The author of Travels with Minna and Godfrey in many Lands. Another version was included by George G. It was first published later that year in the collection of booklets known as Bells and Pomegranates and was reprinted in and Browning further follows Verstegen in describing how one lame boy could not keep up with the rest and so was not swallowed up in the hill to which the piper led them.

Again, like Verstegen, he mentions the tradition that connects the German community in Transylvania with Hamelin, suggesting some inexplicable subterranean route between them. The piper is a compelling figure, attractive to children, but suspicious to those in authority. Another illustrated version of Browning with pictures by T.

Der Mensch und der Bär Märchen aus Bosnien hörspiel

Butler-Stoney was published by Ernest Nister in This is set in the fifteenth century and follows Browning for the first act, but diverges in the second act to provide a restoration of the children to their parents. Presumably the transposition of the story to the stage and the context of popular entertainment required a happy ending. George, c. Kokerill is captured in the shape of a bird and strangled, and the children make their way back home, arriving there after the winter, a year after their disappearance.

Gilbert and Tobias are reconciled and become friends, and Nieritz ends his story with the moral that Kokerill represents vice, which all children ought to shun. It is interesting to note the changes to the original legend that both Nieritz and Robert Buchanan found necessary to make it palatable to nineteenth-century children and their parents. It has illustrations credited to T. The main item among the Norg myths is a retelling of the medieval German poem whose title she gives as The Rose-Garden of King Lareyn Laurin , in which Lareyn, the last of the Norgs, having abducted Simild, the daughter of duke Biterolf, is attacked by her brother, Dietlieb, Theodoric and Wittich in his magic rose-garden.

Lareyn has a cloak of darkness that makes him invisible and a girdle that gives him the strength of twelve men, but Theodoric manages to defeat him.

Highlight on the German Fairy Tales Road (Deutsche Märchenstraße)

After several further exploits Lareyn is defeated and made court fool by Theodoric in his palace at Verona. The Tirolean tales are thus clearly part of the well-known stock of European, specifically German, folktales, but have their own character from the mountains and remote valleys in which the stories are located. However, the temper of the majority of tales in this collection is dark and brooding, focussing on family disputes and crimes of passion leading to the destruction of all involved. Three centre in various ways on entanglements with the Devil.