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I Agree This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and if not signed in for advertising. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms. Links Wikipedia: author article. Series description This series covers the overall universe in which Nathan Lowell writes his novels. A subseries "Trader's Tale" involves one character in this universe, but the novel "South Coast" and a work-in-progress, "Cape Grace", are part of the "Shaman's Tale" subseries.

Trader's Tales. Phillip Carstairs. Sarah Krugg. Richard Krugg. Otto Krugg. SC Agamemnon. SC William Tinker. Related book awards Parsec Award Finalist.

Quarter Share: A Trader's Tale from the Golden Age of the Solar Clipper, Book 1 (Unabridged)

How do series work? I have a soft spot in my reader's heart for the first novels in a series. My favorite Harry Potter book is still Sorcerer's Stone, even though I admit the latter books were better written. There's an innocence to first novels and a sense of wonder in the exploration of new worlds that the following books often lack. And so it is with Nathan Lowell's Quarter Share. Like many young me I have a soft spot in my reader's heart for the first novels in a series. Like many young men, about to enter college, he has no real idea where his life is going. Until the day his ancient-lit professor mother dies in an tragic accident.

Now that would be a life-changing shock for anyone, but then he's quickly informed by the company that owns the whole planet that he can't enter college as planed, his mother left him nothing, he's broke, he can't get a job, and he's about to be deported at his own expense. His only way off the planet is to join the merchant shipping fleet that regularly sends freighters to the planet.

Without knowing what he's about to get himself into or that he's not even supposed to try , he heads off to the union hall and signs up. Luck, and his own resilient nature, gets him a low paying job in the galley of the Lois McKendrick, and what he doesn't know about working in space is our gateway to Mr. Lowell's wonderfully thought out and expansive universe.

As Ish works his way though the rigors of ship life, he leads us on a guided tour of what the work-a-day life of the common spacer might be like in a few hundred years. Too many science fiction stories focus solely on the heroics of space exploration and military action. That's all well and good, but personally I can never quite imagine myself in those roles. Where are the middle-aged working women of the 24th century? Well, in this story one of them is the captain of the ship! I love the breadth of characters in Quarter Share. From Ish's best mate, Pip, with all his trading expertise and penchant for for non sequitur remarks, to the almost robot-like first mate, these are people you know; people you've worked with; people you can relate to.

Quarter Share is like Working Girl in space and after reading it or rereading it, as I've done several times it makes me yearn for a chance to "sign the articles" and ship out on a solar clipper. This is not the best written of Mr. Lowell's many works, but it will always be my favorite because it introduced me to the Golden Age of the Solar Clipper.

Feb 19, Satka rated it it was ok.

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This is a book about building, growing, and learning. All these concepts lead to well described positive situations, where the characters evolve in a world which rules are mainly based on economy even the economy of space and weight. I wouldn't describe it as a Science-Fiction novel though. Even if most of the situations take place in space or on space stations, I found myself more often than not thinking the protagonists were aboard an Earthly sea vessel, in a time when trade was an essential p This is a book about building, growing, and learning. Even if most of the situations take place in space or on space stations, I found myself more often than not thinking the protagonists were aboard an Earthly sea vessel, in a time when trade was an essential part of world economy.

I suppose one of the author's intentions is to unveil the mundane part of a far future we are accustomed to see filled of tentacled aliens or galactic wars. This approach is fresh and interesting, and I enjoyed listening to the chapters where the main character is faced with dilemmas I could instantly understand. And so, forgetting that we are in deep space, this is a story about someone's ordinary life. One thing bothered me after a while: I found that the events depicted rarely if ever put the characters in situations of questioning, or intense doubt.

I was preparing myself to follow people whose ordinary life was pebbled with uncertainties, regrets, fear, joy, stubbornness, illumination or stupidity. But I felt the main character among others had a limpid view of what his course of actions would be, and never doubted he would succeed in any endeavour he would put his mind to. This, I felt, was more a trait of a heroic character, an archetype who could not fail. He no longer was an ordinary man in my eyes. This difference between what I was hearing and what I was feeling lessened the experience, I'm afraid.

Maybe I approached this book the wrong way, but its chemistry didn't translate into an alchemy for me This is not shoot-em-up science fiction. No exploding spaceships, no phasers or light-swords, no monsters. The most violent event, apart from the death of the narrator's mother before the book begins, is a mugging, and all characters appear to be direct descendants of Terrans, living spread across the galaxy in a state of profound peace.

This is also not thinky science fiction. No philosophical discursions, no demand that the reader confront distasteful, alarming, or painful ideas. Ishmael yes, This is not shoot-em-up science fiction. Ishmael yes, seriously Wang is forced by circumstance to take a berth on a solar clipper--complete with solar sails and a gravity keel.

There is no conflict. Ishmael is liked on sight by officers and fellow crew members and takes--as a duck to water--to shipboard life, the onboard community, and the personal trading in which roughly half the crew appears to engage. Not a bad book. The style is reasonably polished, albeit sprinkled with slightly jarring turn-of-the-twentieth-century jargon and it could have used a tad more copyediting and proofreading. It's just that. A useful book to have around if, in a time of turmoil, one needs a bland and undemanding read.

Series: Golden Age of the Solar Clipper

And curiously compelling--I find myself tempted to read on into the series to see if anything ever does happen. View all 3 comments. Dec 05, Ryan rated it it was amazing Shelves: space-opera , audiobooks , all-time-favourites. This podcast-only novel was something of a space opera, but not quite. It has a lot of space opera-like qualities - there's a lot of intergalactic travel without being too hard sci-fi-ish, some references to old naval traditions, and.

What it's lacking, though, is anything particularly operatic. Instead of a grand destiny, or a quest, or anything noble like that, we instead get the story of a guy working on a ship, just kind of doing his thing. He's motivated to go to space mostly because if he This podcast-only novel was something of a space opera, but not quite. He's motivated to go to space mostly because if he doesn't, he'll get deported, and while he seems to enjoy what he does, and is good at it, and that seems to suit him fine enough. What's great about this story, though, is that Lowell manages to strike at the heart of the fundamental nobility of that kind of a common, working-class lifestyle - that a simple life, well-lived, is something to be proud of.

It's not a story that gets told often - a look in any bookstore or library will reveal a lot more stories about generals than soldiers - but it's a nice change to hear a story like this one. I really enjoyed this book and I already bought and downloaded Half Share, the second book in the series. Short, fast paced, light reading. Call the hero Ishmael, really! And his middle name is Horatio. The author had me at the hero's names. I read all the Horation Hornblower novels as a teenager and loved them to pieces. I have re-read them many times over the years and still think they are among the best adventure novels I have ever read.

A Trader's Tale from the Golden Age of the Solar Clipper Series Audiobooks | zopusalawyky.ga

This books sticks to the feel of those books minus the I really enjoyed this book and I already bought and downloaded Half Share, the second book in the series. This books sticks to the feel of those books minus the Napoleonic wars and transplants the seafaring folk into space.

But space is only a background setting for the actual plot here -- the life and coming of age of a young man on a ship, how he settles into his new life of duty and faces the challenges he's being confronted with. The various main characters are charming and vivid, the humour is light hearted and all in all it's a feel-good book that I found hard to put down. View 1 comment.

Jul 25, Teresa Carrigan rated it it was amazing Shelves: science-fiction , reread , binge-starter , reread. I stayed up past 2am to finish it same day I started it. Ok, webcat doesn't have the rest of the series listed, so I can't interlibrary loan them. Next two in series are available as Kindle for cheaper than paperback, so bought them and will read them next. Science fiction, "coming of age". Main character is 18yo named Ishmael. His mother was a lit prof, and she died when the book starts, without enough money left for Ish to attend university as planned.

He gets a job on a merchant freighter s I stayed up past 2am to finish it same day I started it. He gets a job on a merchant freighter space ship. Reminds me a bit of parts of some of the Liaden Universe books. No bad guys other than one set of muggers who attacked another crew member, so it isn't really space opera.


  • Nathan Lowell's "Tales from the Golden Age of the Solar Clipper".
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Jun 29, Sotolf Flasskjegg rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Everybody who likes "level up" books. Shelves: favorites. This book is a very very good starting with nothing and building up kind of book. The characters are good, you start to love the characters, and though not much happends all the time, it's so well written that it really sucks you in, definitely a book worth reading.

Having read this for the third time now, it really is one of my favourites! There isn't much happening, but the comradery and the excellent writing is making it more than worth it to read, I love it! I read this and it immidiately reminded me of how life felt when I was stationed aboard ship with the U. What life is like underway, out of port or any sight of land with the hour to hour day by day grind of just doing your job, is something that has to be experiened to be understood. I wish something had blown up or been shot at, but, this is the Merchant fleet right?

A good light read, enjoyable, uncomplicated but not challenging. I'd classify it as a good space opera. May 12, Dan rated it it was amazing Shelves: Great reads all. Dec 23, D. A teenager's mom dies, so instead of going to university as planned, he has to find a job. He joins a cargo ship and learns the trade, but by helping everyone around him, he brings the crew of the ship closer together.

That's all that happens, no drama or conflict or explosions. This was the perfect kind of dull. I'll be continuing the series for sure. Jul 12, Mark Bylok rated it liked it. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here.


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  • Quarter Share by Nathan Lowell.

I really love the concept of having a book about ordinary people doing ordinary things, and I was enjoying for the first half of the book but eventually things got excessively repetitive. The characters in the book are almost cartoon-ish in depth, and even the 'bad boy' character of the book is easy-going. If I was reading a book about 14 year olds instead of 18 year olds I may have found it more believable. Ultimately, though, the book ends up going through the logic and math behind a fictional I really love the concept of having a book about ordinary people doing ordinary things, and I was enjoying for the first half of the book but eventually things got excessively repetitive.

Ultimately, though, the book ends up going through the logic and math behind a fictional trading business taking place between star ports. This is the part that I found dull, but I perhaps I'm in the minority based on the other reviews. The world development is very good, and done at a steady pace. You'll like this book if you're more about plot development and logical puzzles. It is refreshing to have a book written about every day events like making coffee, trading goods in space, but this really didn't work for me.

Saying that, I'm probably curious enough to read the next in the series at some point to see if the world development is better as the main character gets promoted through the ranks of the crew. Dec 04, Sue Baiman rated it it was amazing. Millions of books are published every year. Many are worth your time. Some are great stories. Few have characters that become a part of you; characters you genuinely care about; characters you wish you knew in real life.

Ishmael Horatio Wang rhymes with gong is one of those characters. A share Millions of books are published every year. A share is just that, a share in the profits of a trading ship. These ships ferry goods between worlds in the not so distant future. These are not stories of epic space battles, or alien invasions. These are the stories of a boy becoming a man and facing the sort of personal challenges such a journey entails. He struggles with personal character issues in ways many of us wish we could. He is an imperfect person as are we all. He experiences triumphs, tragedies, love, and loss with a truly unique and endearing style.

If you are looking to read about epic space battles, these books aren't for you. If, however, you want to go on the journey of a lifetime, with characters you will forever hold dear in your heart, welcome aboard. Oct 15, Patrick rated it liked it Shelves: fiction , science-fiction. Generally well written, this is in many regards a coming-of-age story.

Ishmael Horatio Wang must make his way in life after the tragic passing of his mother. Forced to leave the planet he's grown up on, Wang joins the crew of the Lois McKendrick. The story is about him learning the ways of the ship, being part of the crew, etc. If you are looking for action space opera, don't look here. Lowell's tale is noted for its lack of traditional action, its focus on characters and the day-to-day life aboa Generally well written, this is in many regards a coming-of-age story. Lowell's tale is noted for its lack of traditional action, its focus on characters and the day-to-day life aboard ship and with ship leave.

That is not to say it is boring, but you are likely to think so if your expectations are action. While the characters are interesting, they are not "dark" enough for my tastes. Every one seems to get along. Every one is a nice person. Nonetheless, you will still find yourself rooting for his successes. I'm impressed with how the author is able to convey modesty so compellingly through a character who is rather naturally talented.

The series so far follows Ishmael's life from the age of 18 to 40, which isn't at all middle age in this medically advanced future. The character ages well and in a believable manner. Almost all of the characters have real depth. Moreover, the author should be applauded for their gender and sexuality awareness. I appreciate how the advanced science, technology, and engineering is portrayed. The author doesn't get too hung up on it, and he finds a way to describe these elements within the framework of the plot.

I believe that this really helps the reader understand the concepts even better than most alternatives. You will find yourself having no trouble orientating yourself in this theoretical future. The only thing I wish we know more about is the planets. Unsurprisingly, most of the story takes place on ships or in orbitals. It isn't until the next series that the author even hints at what's going on planet-side in most cases. Earth is only mentioned in passing as Old Earth.

It isn't encountered at all. We have no idea where it is in relation to the star systems visited. This is a bit reminiscent of Hyperion. Give the book a shot. If you end up liking it, you'll be in for a nice long ride. Thank you Mr. Lowell for your efforts in creating this universe. I look forward to the next edition.

It's years in the future and the best thing the main character can do is make coffee, chat about what school courses he's going to take, and get pats on the back from no less then 10 superior officers. Sorry but life is short and this guy needs to hire a better editor. It's a pleasant listen. Nothing ever goes wrong and everyone is nice to each other.

I can only imagine that this is because it should really be the first part of a larger book. What really bothers me is that the book is advertised as over 7 hours long, but when you check the chapters you'll notice the last one is 1 hour by itself. Turns out that's the preview for the next book. That just feel underhanded and scammy. I like the story but am not sure I want to support this practice by buying the rest of the series. While in search of authors new to me I noticed this one coming up.

Out of the Tank Privateer Tales Book 7

The futuristic setting provides the framework of the story rather than being the focus. It is a very gentle story, and I found it surprisingly engaging. It is about encountering problems and overcoming them, about making friends and relationships in a new environment. Looking for a direction in life when the one you had always imagined for yourself is ripped away from you unexpectedly. The narration feels right bringing the feel of almost classical fiction to the reader.

There is a good amount of detail that has gone into the way that this future universe works and how the trading ships operate which comes through. The characters also have a genuine feel to them. I found it a little strange that virtually everyone that Ish, the lead in our story, came directly into contact with was actually genuinely nice. I also have a bit of a beef about the length of the book. Something like an hour of this one is dedicated to a free introduction to the next in the series. Positive is that they are obviously planning to release more of the series for those that will continue with it.

So if that appeals this one may well be worth one of your credits. If so, why? This read less like science fiction and more like a business marketing class. Although we are meant to be moving between star systems we could as easily have been on the Dover Calais ferry. This is very definitely not the Starship Enterprise. Our main Character Ishmael Horatio Wong I kid you not , finds himself orphaned, effectively bankrupt, and homeless in one foul swoop. The morality of throwing a child for the purposes of the book he has just turned 18 onto the street and moving them off planet is glossed over.

I found myself wandering what would have happened if Ishmael had been a couple, even one year year younger. I find it odd that there is no safety net, no hardship fund that the university could have extended, and apparently no media service interested in taking up the story and shaming them into doing something.

This is after all meant to be an advanced society that has moved off planet, but apparently left charity on Earth. The narrator is not the right narrator for this book. There is nothing wrong with him and he does the job well, but the main protagonist is The narrator makes him sound wise beyond his years simply by talking. He is 18 and meant to be finding his feet in the world and yet he comes across as someone who has just changed from one middle management job to another.

He is 18 where is the sex. At that age whether you want it or not your hormones are fizzing and your body is responsive and none of that is here in this narration beyond a few furtive looks and a bit of blushing. However, I did finish it within 24 hours as it is an hour shorter than advertised padded out with an hour from the next book. I note with interest that the books get longer as the series proceeds I hope that this is an indication of a more complex story line.

When I like someone, I kinda follow them, so when I saw that Jeffrey Kafer posted about a new sci fi. I was like, Oh, yes please! I did learn that it wasn't the usual kinda sci fi I read or have started to listen to, but that didn't mean I did not enjoy this. The author Nathan Lowell has really done something different here. This is a very character driven book with people you can soon fall in love with. The main character Ish, has just lost his mum in a tragic accident, and with no parents and no job he's about to be forced off planet, so he takes the first thing offered to him because he's no choice.

The kid finds himself on the Lowis, sp and embarks on a very different way of looking at things, something no one on the ship has seen before. Ish soon makes friends with the people in his department, Cookie and Pip. Even though he shows Pip up, he finds time to actually help the other youngster, and they become not only friends but partners in crime too, getting up to all kinds of trading adventures. Pip, however, isn't having much fun, after losing everything he had in a trade gone wrong, it's the captain and Ish that help him here, and they begin to form a co-op with the ships best interests at heart.

The narration from Jeffrey is great, he's perfect in first person POV and the inner mind of a youngster finding his feet, not only with the fleet, but amongst other people is interesting and very well done. Jeffrey delivers a lot of emotion with hardly any effort and all the characters come alive. I was especially fond of Bev and Dianne. Although he's never been off planet before, the people he meets, all seem a little too nice. Maybe that's because Ish himself is just so nice, he never seems to fire up over much, doesn't really grieve for his mum, and I think I'd really like that, even if it wasn't in the first section of the book, but defo towards the end.

The closest we get to that is when he remembers packing up on the planet, and moving to his new quarters, but I'm not sure if that was actually in the second piece, as there was a few chapters in there for free. I am really interested in seeing what the gang does now though with their trading empire.

I wonder what can go wrong, and what other relationships are going to form. It seemed Ish was starting to become attracted to some of his female friends on a different level, he kinda doesn't mention that from the planet. Thanks for an awesome new series to follow, and I look forward to more! Something a little different. This is a series with a slow burn. It is not my usual listen and I had anticipated after a short time into the book that I would finish the book and leave it there.

However, not so. It is a story, to put it very simplistically, about housekeeping! It starts of with a young lad, whose mother has died, having to fend for himself, so he signs on as a deck hand, more or less. The story gradually unfolds and although not full of battles and fighting, it is a gentle tale of what goes on onboard ship within the crew which have become, more or less, like a family. I am now hooked and about to start the second book.

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Your audiobook is waiting…. By: Nathan Lowell. Narrated by: Jeffrey Kafer. Length: 7 hrs and 44 mins. People who bought this also bought Bray Length: 15 hrs and 3 mins Unabridged Overall. Bray Length: 16 hrs and 23 mins Unabridged Overall. Publisher's Summary What if we sent freighters instead of frigates? Find out what Ishmael must do to earn his Quarter Share.

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