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With the help of a young amanuensis, he then wrote a travel memoir, or rihla. I haven't read the excerpts of his memoir available in modern English translation, b Abu Abdallah ibn Battuta seems to have been a very lucky man. I haven't read the excerpts of his memoir available in modern English translation, but from the reviews I've seen, they sound remarkably uninteresting for a person who saw so much of the world at such an interesting time.

Ross Dunn's book restores much of the excitement, and a coherent chronology, to ibn Battuta's journey. Dunn provides context to understand how the moment of ibn Battuta's arrival in each kingdom fit into the historical arc of the period. This is one of the ways ibn Battuta was lucky: he arrived at most of his destinations just in time to profit from a final flowering of power and peace, and usually left shortly before a slide into chaos.

Beyond his fortuitous timing, ibn Battuta also survived two shipwrecks, several captures by brigands or pirates, and the Black Death. Ultimately, the world ibn Battuta moved through was more compelling than his recorded experience of it, and with this book, you get a fresh and well sourced look at that world. I thought this would be much easier to read than the original I had to slog through in college, and it was, but expectedly it's not nearly as exciting.

And I was let down by the author's use of the original text. This should have been either a breezy travelogue or a hard-core academic book. It falls uncomfortably in between. And if Ibn Battuta lied about his travels as much as Marco Polo did, then I wanted some more explanation for that, and maybe a comparison to the works of the people who didn I thought this would be much easier to read than the original I had to slog through in college, and it was, but expectedly it's not nearly as exciting.

And if Ibn Battuta lied about his travels as much as Marco Polo did, then I wanted some more explanation for that, and maybe a comparison to the works of the people who didn't lie, even if just for context. The maps are great though, and the chapter on his travels up the Nile, through small towns and crossing over to the Arabian Peninsula, is well done. There is some sloppy copyediting that can be jarring. This book was a lot more interesting than the Marco Polo book I just read.

Both are stories of world travelers who experienced exotic lands and have interesting tales to tell about the world. The author of this book keeps the reader engaged with more descriptive detail and gripping stories. Marco Polo is now being made into a series based on the book I just read. I don't see what the hollywood scriptwriter saw in such a blah book. This book is much more interesting and fun to read. Good writing This book was a lot more interesting than the Marco Polo book I just read.

Good writing makes a world of difference. After additional trips to Spain and West Africa he settled down and his story was turned into a Rihla travel narrative by Ibn Juzayy. The Adventures of Ibn Battuta follows Ibn Battuta's travels chronologically, but doesn't stay narrowly focused on the details of his career.

It offers extensive background information and is an approachable introduction to the world of classical Islam as well as a lively and entertaining travel narrative. Dunn uses direct quotations from and simple summaries of the Rihla, but he also works in information from other sources to produce an account that is comprehensible and satisfying to a modern reader.

References and discussions of details are relegated to chapter endnotes. And he engages in speculation about events and thoughts not covered by the Rihla, but without any fictionalisation or dramatisation. At this point in history the city was not the noble capital it had been under the Seljuk Turks and would be again under the Shi'i Safavids.

Because of a sad inclination among the inhabitants to engage in violent factional rows, coupled with the turmoil of the early Mongol years, the city was only beginning to recover some of its earlier vigor. Perhaps dissatisfied with what the town had to show him of Persian culture, Ibn Battuta decided to travel another miles south to Shiraz, chief city of the province of Fars. So the opening chapter "Tangier" looks at the geography of the city and the Straits of Gibraltar and the history of the Almohad dynasty, for example, while the chapter on Persia and Iraq begins by describing the impacts of the Mongols and Turks on Mesopotamia.

More general material includes explanations of the different schools of Islamic law, Sufism, the role of Arabic, and other aspects of the common culture of the Islamic world. The result makes The Adventures of Ibn Battuta almost a guide to the Islamic world in the second quarter of the 14th century.

Gli Straordinari Viaggi di Ibn Battuta: Le Mille Avventure del Marco Polo Arabo

With the travel and biographical material providing an extra attraction — Ibn Battuta's adventures get more exciting than the consumption of watermelon! On the one hand, Ibn Battuta's journey throughout the medieval Muslim world was fascinating and the author does a nice job of capturing the flavor of the mosaic of ruling powers throughout the Near, Middle and Far East. The drawbacks are the way Ibn Battuta's journeys were chronicled a couple of years after he returned from over 20 years of traveling.

There is some doubt as to some of his journeys and there are references from scholars of Ibn Battuta's time that cast him as a liar. At the beginni On the one hand, Ibn Battuta's journey throughout the medieval Muslim world was fascinating and the author does a nice job of capturing the flavor of the mosaic of ruling powers throughout the Near, Middle and Far East.

At the beginning I was led to believe the Rihla, the name for Ibn Battuta's chronicle, would paint be more of a story of a man traveling the world. The way it is presented here is less a story and more a list of places and people with historical background.

The material is valuable and insightful but I was hoping for something else. The Adventures of Ibn Battuta might best serve as a companion to a translation of the Rihla. On top of that, I might like to read a fictionalized account of Ibn Battuta's journeys that has the courage to flesh out picture of the man and the people he encounters.

This was a really fun book, with a touch of dry humor to it. It's actually a really good introduction to Islam as well. For Muslims, it's hard to believe what the world was once like, and it's harder to believe Ibn Battuta traveled across it all before the advent of cars, rails, and planes. His life and career exemplify a remarkable fact of Afro-Eurasian history in the later Middle Period, that, as Marshall Hodgson writes, Islam 'came closer than an other medieval society to establishing a common world order of social and even cultural standards.

But in the Indian Ocean lands where Islam was a minority faith, all Muslims shared acutely this feeling of participation. Simply to be a Muslim in East Africa, southern India, or Malaysia in the fourteenth century was to have a cosmopolitan frame of mind. The name carries a certain irony, for it suggested to the fourteenth century a meaning contrary to the modern image of a throng of wild barbarians riding into battle. The men on foot in front of the sultan and the other persons present scrambled for the money, and they kept on scattering it until the procession reached the palace.

They exchanged gold until they depressed its value in Egypt an caused its price to fall. From Tangier to the ends of the earth and back Centuries-old travelogues tend to have this archaic, dusty sort of air about them. We can't identify with the people who wrote them because the language in no way resembles ours.

This is of course the fault of those who translate those documents. Then too, travellers of medieval times or earlier tended to write about things not so much of interest today. Dunn has successfully avoided these problems by w From Tangier to the ends of the earth and back Ibn Battuta travelled around the civilized world of his day. Surprisingly enough for Eurocentric folks, the term "civilized" only included Spain at that time. It did, however, include most of the Islamic regions on earth, plus India and China.

In each, he gives a picture of the times in that particular place, what Ibn Battuta said he saw and what he must have seen or experienced but didn't mention.

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Dunn recounts many of the Moroccan's interesting adventures, from being jailed in Delhi to trying as a judge to forbid Maldivian women going topless in public. Dunn also places Ibn Battuta in a framework of a hemisphere-wide Islamic civilization and as an ambitious semi-scholar who was perhaps not so well studied as he wanted people to believe. So, not only is this book a record of Ibn Battuta's life and voyages, it is a very interesting commentary on a large part of the world in the 14th century and the life story of a particular individual.

If you like history, if you are interested in what was happening in the world beyond Europe in the days when "knights were bold" [and illiterate], read this book. It comes with good maps and some black and white photographs of places that might still look a bit like what they did in Ibn Battuta's time. Although the title says "adventures", read "scholarly treatise on the travels". This is a heavily footnoted book dense with references to original sources and previous commentaries on them.

My favorite ones were those discussing the routes and times proposed by different authorities "So and so says it was in May of this year, but that seems implausible based on the cities mentioned. The scholarly back-and-forth aside, Although the title says "adventures", read "scholarly treatise on the travels".

The scholarly back-and-forth aside, this book is fairly approachable even for someone entirely outside the field, like myself. Each chapter handles a section of Ibn Battuta's travels that took place in a particular region. His travels begin in his home country of Morocco, and then he journeys onward throughout the middle east. After that, he quickly moves much further afield - across the steppes, up to Constantinople, then on to India, the Maldives, and even to China. Ibn Battuta obtains favors from many rulers, adds followers to his train and leaves them again, and sometimes takes part in political machinations.

Mostly though, this is an absolutely fascinating glimpse into another time, which was much more cosmopolitan than I was aware of before picking up this book. My rating is mostly because I learned so much, about kingdoms and cultures I had no idea existed. Ibn Battuta was a Berber born in Tangier. He was educated as a Moslem jurist and when he set off in to make the Hajj the adventure of travel was ignited. He spent over 40 years on the road. He mostly traveled in the Dar el Islam and spent most of his time with the moslem upper class who generally spoke Arabic and so even in Persia, Central Asia or India he could get by.

He sometimes did his legal work but not often. He is credited with traveling to China but his appears to be untrue; he may have padded his resume with reports by others. Even so, this book is fascinating for its description of the Islamic world of the Middle ages. It was still a place of learning and culture and a thriving commercial scene. I really recommend this engaging book.

While Ibn Battuta's accounts across the globe seem more like a piece of history to me than anything else, I still found a basis on which to rate this book. I especially liked the background Dunn gave on the areas Ibn Battuta traveled to prior to actually quoting the Rihla. I thought it really put the text in context and helped make for an easy read. Of all the books that fall into the travel writing genre, I would have to say Ibn Battuta's accounts are my favorite.

Upon comparing his own account While Ibn Battuta's accounts across the globe seem more like a piece of history to me than anything else, I still found a basis on which to rate this book. Upon comparing his own accounts to say those of Mark Twain, the value of the Rihla increases significantly. Ibn Battuta was, in my opinion, much less discriminating than Twain - his accounts are accounts of curiosity, awe, and sheer fascination.

I've read this book multiple times and every time it's a new and different experience for me, I would highly recommend it. My ratings of books on Goodreads are solely a crude ranking of their utility to me, and not an evaluation of literary merit, entertainment value, social importance, humor, insightfulness, scientific accuracy, creative vigor, suspensefulness of plot, depth of characters, vitality of theme, excitement of climax, satisfaction of ending, or any other combination of dimensions of value which we are expected to boil down through some fabulous alchemy into a single digit. A lucid, accessible overview of Ibn Battuta's travels, contextualizing and quoting from the Rihla.

I've found that it works well as an introduction for students, especially those with very little background knowledge. A wonderful recounting of Ibn Battuta's travels that's also a broader history of the Islamic world of the 14th century, exploring Sufism, jurisprudence, trade, pilgrimage, politics, and culture in a panoramic portrait of an interconnected, cosmopolitan, globalized world.

This isn't a bad book, but I kept waiting for the "adventure" part. Much of the book read like an encyclopedia or summary. The added background sections were interesting, but I just wanted more. Born in in what is Tangiers, Morocco, Ibn Battuta set off on a pilgrimage to Mecca in , but over the next 30 odd years, visited what are today Egypt, East Africa, Lebanon, Greece, the Caucuses, Persia, India, the Maldives, Sri Lanka, possibly China, Mali and Spain before return to Tangiers and where he, late in life, dictated his account of his travels to a scribe.

While there are other modern accounts of his travels, I found this book a fascinating account of not just his travels but fourteenth century life in those parts of the world he visited. This book was assigned to my daughter for her AP World History course, and looked interesting so I decided to read it and found it worth the time. Ibn Battuta was the Marco Polo of the Muslim world in the 14th century and traveled from his home in Morocco across the Middle East, up to the Caucuses, then down to India and crossed the fault lines of various dynasties and cultures.

Some points I found interesting: - During his travels Battuta was not treated as a Moroccan, but as a member of Dar al-I This book was assigned to my daughter for her AP World History course, and looked interesting so I decided to read it and found it worth the time. Some points I found interesting: - During his travels Battuta was not treated as a Moroccan, but as a member of Dar al-Islam, the wider Muslim world.

The religion had an remarkable unifying influence. The idea was that they would be in service to the empire vs. I was in the cabin, along with a man from the Maghrib named Abu Bakr, and I bade him go up on deck to observe the state of the sea. He did so and came back to me in the cabin saying to me, 'I commend you to God. In the young Morrocan Ibn Battuta left his home to make the pilgrimage to Mecca. On the way, he became enamoured with travel and travelled half the world, from North Africa to China, before returning to his home in His record of his journeys, the Rihla, is difficult to read and chaotically organised, leading historian Ross E.

Dunn to present Ibn Battuta's story in a more accessible format. The Adventures of Ibn Battuta is an extremely interesting book, and I recommend it highly to any In the young Morrocan Ibn Battuta left his home to make the pilgrimage to Mecca. The Adventures of Ibn Battuta is an extremely interesting book, and I recommend it highly to anyone interested in world history.

Battuta's memoirs often lack detail, so Dunn has put his travels in context by bringing in outside information. Thus, before covering Battuta's travels over the steppe of Northern Asia, he explains how the Mongols came to acquire so much territory and then convert to Islam. Another interesting part of Battuta's story is how Europeans and inhabitants of the Middle East interacted in the 14th century. Battuta gives an anecdote about a stay in a Muslim town in the Crimean where Italian traders had an outpost.

Hearing the Italian's churchbells, which sounded to him like a diabolic cacophony, he and his friends immediately ran to the roof and began to make the muezzin call to prayer. Luckily, there was no violent conflict from this culture class. Dunn's background information also gives interesting details of European activity in Asia during the late Middle Ages. A clear study of Ibn Battuta's travelogue for the non-specialist. It's most accurate to call it an abridgement of the travels with commentary, with context about the medieval world of the time.

The introduction admits that much itself.

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Dunn makes quick mention about historiographical issues, like chronology and text-lifting from other contemporary writings plagiarism was viewed differently in the medieval Muslim literati, apparently , and hides the denser details in the end-of-chapter footnotes A clear study of Ibn Battuta's travelogue for the non-specialist. Dunn makes quick mention about historiographical issues, like chronology and text-lifting from other contemporary writings plagiarism was viewed differently in the medieval Muslim literati, apparently , and hides the denser details in the end-of-chapter footnotes.

As you might expect, some of the vividity of the writing might be lost through Dunn's summarizing, but for me I was pleased by it. It is also important to note, Dunn does not try to render the places directly as Battuta saw it, opting for a more critical angle of his recollections. In all, a useful introduction to the study of Ibn Battuta's narrative, and of the parts of the medieval world that he visited. I can't say whether this offers enough for students who have already read Battuta's narrative, but as a non-historian I came from this book with a more coherent perspective on the dar al-Islam.

The Adventures of Ibn Battuta provides in vivid detail all the countries he had visited, including Egypt, Hijaz present day Saudi Arabia as well as his home country, the Maghrib present day Morocco. The most significant part of his Rihla journey would have to be his stay at Mecca to perform Hajj the pilgrimage to Mecca which a Muslim must perform at least once in their life where he performed all the religious rites necessary alongside thousands of Muslims from all over the world. What I The Adventures of Ibn Battuta provides in vivid detail all the countries he had visited, including Egypt, Hijaz present day Saudi Arabia as well as his home country, the Maghrib present day Morocco.

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Zanzotto, Andrea 1921-

With this record, this famous Dark Industrial project offers us again a mesmerizing recording of drones and tones, bringing us into a state of isolation and introspection. With this CD, Amon has tried to write music with a new process. The result is a very slowly changing opus that sounds like it had been recorded in space.

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